Skip to content

Ripley presents Kaleidoscope Chamber Music Ensemble

First Congregational Church’s Ripley Chapel will host the Kaleidoscope Chamber Music Ensemble on Jan. 19 for a chamber concert, beginning at 7:30 p.m. COURTESY PHOTO/ FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH |

Table of Contents

On Friday, Jan. 19, “Contemporaneous Kaleidoscope: Music of our time,” featuring strings, oboe, flute, bassoon and piano in a stirring chamber concert will be life and live streamed, beginning at 7:30 p.m., from Ripley Chapel at First Congregational Church, 21 Church St.

Formed in 1996 by musicians with a wealth of chamber music experience, Kaleidoscope Chamber Music Ensemble committed itself from the beginning to presenting a wide musical repertory, diverse in style, period, and instruments. As the name implies, the group’s combination and number of instruments is constantly changing, even within a single concert.

Chamber works with as few as two players may be programmed with larger works of up to six or more performers which include string players, wind players and a pianist. Kaleidoscope’s broad repertoire ranges from works from the Baroque era to the most recent 21st century compositions.

“Contemporaneous Kaleidoscope” features Jill Dreeben, flute; Charlyn, Bethel, oboe; Tracy McGinnis, bassoon; Beth Welty, violin; Dani Rimoni, viola; Sandi-Jo Malmon, cello; Elizabeth Skavish, piano.

The concert program will feature the following:

“Roots II” by David Baker (1931-2016), 5-movement suite commissioned by the Beaux Arts Trio, 1992.

“American Canvas” by Jennifer Higdon (1962 -), 3-movement piece, 2015, each movement a sonic and harmonic ode to Georgia O'Keefe, Jackson Pollock, Andrew Wyeth, respectively.

“Peace” for violin and piano by Jessie Montgomery (1981 - ), pensive and melancholy yet energetic, written in response to the initial quarantine orders from the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Trio for Oboe, Bassoon and Piano” by Andre Previn (1929-2019), 3-movement work, with a nod to Poulenc, full of energy, jazz rhythms and sweeping harmonies.

“Loop” by Carlos Simon (1986 -), for string trio, a very different, deeply felt response to the never-ending “loop” of quarantine from COVID-19.

Tickets are $20 (in-person or live stream): https://bit.ly/RPKscope

For more information about the concert, visit https://fcc-winchester.com/

or contact Jane Ring Frank, Minister of Worship and the Arts at 857-919-0983 or at jringfrank@gmail.com.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Ripley Chapel can be found at First Congregational Church, Winchester, 21 Church St. The entry is located on the Vine Street side of the church. Please use the accessible ramp entrance, and Ripley Chapel will be directly to your right as you enter the building.

Latest

Send us your garden photos

Send us your garden photos

Hey, Winchester, it’s spring! And that means warm days, birds singing, trees budding and of course, gardens and gorgeous flowers. We recently asked local gardeners Charlene Band and Shannon Scott-Vernaglia to send us a few photos of how their gardens look at the moment. We would love it if

Hank Wonder returns to Ripley Chapel on April 27

Hank Wonder returns to Ripley Chapel on April 27

The following was submitted by Ripley Chapel: On Saturday, April 27, Ripley Chapel is pleased to welcome back Hank Wonder – a dynamic trio of musicians who return with their special blend of songcraft and music making, beginning at 7:30 p.m. at First Congregational Church, 21 Church St. Somewhere

The Griffin wants YOUR photos

The Griffin wants YOUR photos

A few years ago, the Arthur Griffin Museum of Photography was part of a national exhibit called The Photoville Fence.  That has morphed into a different exhibit and Museum Director Crista Dix is looking for photographs from Winchester residents. For the second year, “Our Town” will assemble a collection of

Helpers Among Us — Oxfam

Helpers Among Us — Oxfam

Getting to know Winchester folks who do good work for the larger community has been the subject of this column, but this week your reporter talked with a woman who does good work for the entire world. Abby Maxman has been the director of Oxfam America since 2017, after a