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Change of venue! Raising funds for the WIN Fast Forest with game adventure, Valentine’s Day cards

Grow Local for the Planet is partnering Wright-Locke Farm to plant a 'fast' forest at the farm. The goal is to restore a bit of Low Habitat Value agricultural wetlands by the farm’s pond to a High Habitat Value mature forest. COURTESY PHOTO

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The following was submitted by Prassede Calabi on behalf of the Fast Forest committee.

Calling board game wizards and curious first-timers of all ages to a gaming adventure for the WIN Fast Forest!

Come join a family-friendly extravaganza of board games and laughter on Saturday, Feb. 3 and every “First Saturday” through October, from 12-3 p.m., at the Unitarian Universalist Church, 478 Main St., Winchester.

Imagine a world where your love of board games helps “make’ habitat” - like caterpillars, to feed baby birds (a baby black-capped chickadee eats about 1000 caterpillars growing up).

Entry is just $15 at the door. Each ticket plants a sapling in the WIN Fast Forest

Games include Catan, OuiSi, Sequence, UNO, Codenames, Monopoly and any you want to bring!

Want a forever-Valentine? 

Sponsor native plant(s) in the WIN Fast Forest. While flowers are gone in a few days, the forest will last hundreds of years.

Your Valentine’s name(s) will be added as you specify - onto the Donor list.

And you will be sent a pretty card with mailing-envelope, one per donation you designate.

     a. Click here https://givebutter.com/winfastforest

     b. Choose an amount.

     c. In the “note or comment’ section, please say how many cards, the Valentine’s

name(s), and your snail-mail address.

     d. Valentine name(s) go onto a permanent list on the Fast Forest website, and your cards will be mailed to share with your Valentine!

 Amounts are: $25 for one plant, 5 for $100, 30 for $500.

Donations to the Fast Forest are tax deductible.

The WIN Fast Forest

Wanna help pollinators and lots of native critters for hundreds of years? Help plant a bit of mature native forest.

Why forest? Cuz plants are the base of the food pyramid. Trees are big and sturdy; they feed and shelter a lot of critters; they last a long time.

 

WIN Fast Forest is planting 39 plant species, 16 of them trees, in a small plot. at Wright Locke Conservancy. Why so many? Because most insects are specialized to eat just one or a few plants. And because so very many critters eat insects. Lots of insects. One clutch of black-capped chickadees needs some 7,000 caterpillars to fledge; a hummingbird needs up to 2,000 insects per day for her young.

Please pitch in. Watch your donation grow – and know it will keep growing for a few hundred years.

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